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Bumper Crop

Don’t let anybody tell you that heirloom tomatoes just don’t produce very well.

tomatoharvest

Mostly Pink Brandywine, couple of Cherokee Purples in there too.

This is just the last couple days worth, off three plants. We’ve gone through a couple of bowls full doing tomato sandwiches, bruschetta, chopping them over spaghetti, Kevin’s putting them in his salads…now they’re starting to pile up a bit as we run out of the usual methods. Kevin swears he’ll make salsa or sauce or something tomorrow.

There’s still probably a bowl worth ripe on the plants, I just haven’t gone out to bring them in yet. (When I get really ambitious, I have one potted tomato that has run its course and needs to be sent to the compost heap and replaced with petunias or something. Given the heat recently, I am not all that ambitious.)

It’s been a heckuva year for tomatoes—one of the Brandywines, trained over an arch, is really quite a glorious thing, and I’m probably going to do that every year now—and even the notoriously finicky Cherokee Purple is producing a bumper crop.

Incidentally, they are all upside-down in the bowl because America’s Test Kitchen determined in multiple trials that a tomato stored upside down—or with tape over the stem hole!—lasts two or three days longer than stored upright. Turns out that the air and the bacteria and whatnot that lead it to rot get in primarily through the hole left by the stem, so by placing them stem-side down, you get a couple of extra days on your tomato. How awesome is that?

Originally published at Squash's Garden. You can comment here or there.

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You could always advertise them on Craigslist, if you don't want to give them away.

They look scrummy. I wonder if the top down works for other fruit, or just tomatoes?

Could do a tomato pie. Those are pretty nice, especially if you have fresh basil.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00trrby this might be of interest. Why modern tomato breeds don't have as much taste as heirloom ones.

(Before reading the link) I always assumed it was the same reason commercial roses don't smell like the ones you grow in your garden - they bred them for durability and transportation rather than taste/smell.

Briefly and skipping over all the neat science-y details? Yep! :)

I want your tomatoes (and no, that's not a euphemism).

It’s been a heckuva year for tomatoes—one of the Brandywines, trained over an arch, is really quite a glorious thing, and I’m probably going to do that every year now—and even the notoriously finicky Cherokee Purple is producing a bumper crop.

Huh! Interesting. I've got the opposite situation: my Brandywine is having trouble and has only produced one tomato, whereas my Cherokee Purple is going hog wild and churning them out. The plants are right next to each other in the garden and I cannot figure out why one is struggling way more than the other. There may be a slight lighting difference, I guess!

Thanks for the storage tip. Gonna give that a try with my fresh crop of Cherokee Purples!

Make this, it's easy, delicious, keeps well.

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/vegetarian-recipes/roasted-balsamic-tomatoes-with-leeks

Any onions will do. Any tomatoes. It's wonderful. Did I mention it's easy?

Two things to do with fresh tomatoes:

The Greek version of Calabrese:
Sliced tomatoes, cucumber, and red onions, sprinkled with oregano and crumbled feta cheese, drizzled with red wine vinegar and olive oil.
(The Californian version of this has diced avocado as well. [I have a 40-foot tall avocado tree in my back yard. No matter how hard I try, the local squirrel and opossum population dines on gravity-produced guacamole for a good chunk of the year.])

Very baked tomatoes:
Slice very ripe tomatoes horizontally, put them in a roasting pan cut side up. Top with chopped garlic (1 clove per tomato), herbs (oregano, thyme, ..), salt and pepper. Add a couple of tablespoons of olive oil. Cook at 300 degrees for hours until the tomatoes slump and there's lots of juice bubbling in the roasting pan. Eat the tomatoes. Sop up the juice with bread and eat it or save it to do something fun (I've mixed it with balsamic vinegar as a dressing and a marinade and thrown it into pasta sauce.).

Don’t let anybody tell you that heirloom tomatoes just don’t produce very well.

Who on gods green earth says that?!?! Crazy people that's who.

Hm. That does explain why the tomatoes on the vine last longer in the fridge than the ones that are all loose in the bins in the produce section!

What if you leave the stem on them? Does that make any difference?

My gramma always stores her on the counter upside down. She also cans what she has leftover. So yummy.

So....I don't have anything much to say about the tomatoes or gardening due to my lack of experience besides eating them other than Yay Tomatoes! But I did notice the 8O face being made in the upper right corner in the background as if the objects in your kitchen were also amazed at the number of tomatoes. It amused me. >_>